Large Grants for Independent Research Projects

Wednesday 13 Jun 18
|
by Morten Andersen

Contact

Esben Thormann
Professor
DTU Chemistry
+4545 25 24 39

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Kasper Planeta Kepp
Professor
DTU Chemistry
+4545 25 24 09

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Martin Nielsen
Assistant Professor
DTU Chemistry
+4524 65 10 45

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Klaus Braagaard Møller
Professor
DTU Chemistry
+4545 25 24 61

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Günther H.J. Peters
Professor
DTU Chemistry
+4545 25 24 86

Smart polymers, protein stability, fuel cells and solar energy headline new projects at DTU Chemistry made possible by Independent Research Fund Denmark (DFF).

Thin polymer layers able to protect wings of airplanes and wind turbines against formation of ice. Accurate studies of protein folding disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Environmentally benign pretreatment of hydrogen for fuel cells. And improved understanding of active molecules in solar energy materials.

These are the ambitions in new research projects about to start at DTU Chemistry following successful Independent Research Fund Denmark (DFF) applications. As always, competition for DFF funding was fierce in 2018. Still, DTU Chemistry researchers were able to attract means which will significantly strengthen several core areas at the department.

A new project aims at preventing ice-formation through synthesis of thin polymeric films for surfaces which need to be kept ice-free. Examples of structures critically exposed to formation of ice are heat exchangers, transmission lines, and wings of airplanes and wind turbines. Professor Esben Thormann, DTU Chemistry, is Principal Investigator. More here: Smart Polymers may prevent Icy Airplane Wings

Professor Kasper Planeta Kepp, DTU Chemistry, is Principal Investigator in a quest for significantly improving the accuracy of current state-of-the-art methods for prediction of changes in stability after protein modification. This is highly relevant for industry screenings to identity stable industrial enzymes. Also, in investigations on protein folding disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease. More here: Accurate Computational Prediction of Protein Stability

Thirdly, a new project with Assistant Professor Martin Nielsen, DTU Chemistry, as Principal Investigator is aimed at fuel cell applications. Fuel cells with hydrogen (H2) as feedstock are considered an important part of a clean future energy system. However, most H2 contains CO, which is poisonous to fuel cells. The project is to demonstrate the first efficient homogeneously catalyzed process for removal of CO from H2 at low temperatures. More here: An enabling Tool for Fuel Cell Operation

In a 50:50 joint effort with DTU Physics, a new project at DTU Chemistry will improve understanding of key molecules in solar energy materials. Notably, the project takes advantage of Denmark’s participation in the world’s most powerful X-ray laser, the XFEL in Hamburg. Professor Martin Meedum Nielsen, DTU Physics, is Principal Investigator with Professor Klaus Braagaard Møller, DTU Chemistry, as Co-Investigator. More here: Fundamental Properties of Solar Energy Materials

Finally, Associate Professor Günther Peters, DTU Chemistry, takes part in a project sponsored by DFF within Simulation Assisted Enzyme Design. Principal Investigator here is Professor Peter Westh, Roskilde University (RUC). The project is mainly done at RUC with participation from Novozymes. Günther Peters will contribute with his experience in computational studies of biomolecular interactions.

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